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Why is it only 14%–26% of the fuels energy gets used to move my car down the road?
Where does the fuel go in my car and why is it so inefficient?
In a typical car, the drivetrain eats up about 5 to 6% of the energy from the engine, in an electric design it’s close to 0%.
A electric motor itself is fantastically efficient, varying between 85 and 95% efficient across the entire range of speeds!
Why is an electric car soo much more efficient than my dino juice powered piston engine car or truck?
How does the tank to wheel efficiency compare between an electric and petrol car?
Why do we need to make a Global Shift to electric vehicle's, electron drive-train?


Why is it only 14%–26% of the fuels energy gets used to move my car down the road?
Why is it only 14%–26% of the fuels energy gets used to move my car down the road? For a good explanation check out this link: http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/atv.shtml

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Where does the fuel go in my car and why is it so inefficient?
Energy Alert: Where the power goes An explanation of the inefficiency of modern piston engine cars. Let's see what happens to the energy we put into our machines. A pound of liuid hydrocarbon fuel contains some 19,000 British Therma Units (BTU) of potential heat energy and 2545 BTU per hour is the heat equivelant of one horsepower. A gallon of gas weighs six pounds. So it contains 115,000 BTU of chemical energy. If a carefully ridden middleweight uses a gallon per hour at leagal speed, that fuel flow equates to 45 "heat horsepower." We know from coast down and other tests, however that motorcycles actually use something like 8 horsepower, only 18 percent of the energy supplied as fuel, to maintain this speed. Where does the other 82 percent go? Read on. Because detonation limits the compression ratio, large losses --40 percent-- result from a less than infinite expansion of the burned charge. Much of the loss is exhaust heat energy not available to do work because its pressure is too low. More energy is lost from early opening of the exhaust valve --necessary to accelerate the exhaust process. Other heat is given up directly to the combustion chamber and piston surfaces near to center, and more again transfers to cylinder walls during the power stroke. In all, some 75% of the fuel's energy is lost before it ever gets to the crankshaft. The other 25% or so appears as pressure, driving the pistons down, but only part of this force bennefits the locomotion process. Pistons and rings have friction, as do connecting rods bearings, crank main bearing, and valve train mechanisms. Crankcase windage losses siphon power. Air must be pumped into and out of the engine, generating fluid friction. Accessories -the ignition -the oil -the water pump -alternaor -power steering -etc; take thier toll. Of our 25 percent, called indicated horsepower, at best only some 85% appears at the crank. Even now we havent't reached the rear tire, where the main event occurs. Power must first pass throught the primary gears of the chain, which will be only 95% efficient. Next comes the main gearbox, with its five or siz pairs of spinning gears all whirling in an oil storm -if we get 95%efficiency here we're lucky. Finally comes the chain or shaft drive to the rear wheel. Give this another 95%. To get the total transmission efficiency we multiply all the separate efficiencies together -0.95x0.95x0.95 to get about 85% efficiency. Therefore, of what's available at the crank, expect no more than 85% at the rear wheel. At very high RPM, expect less than that. How's that for a tangled bureaucracy of power? Every department you pass through takes its squeeze, and you stagger out the far side luck to still have bus fare. Of the potential chemical energy you put in as fuel, you are getting at best some 18% to apply to your job -driving the tires and moving the vehicle forward. Where does that put your vehicle in the panoply of man's prime movers? The best steam eledtric plants reach 50% thermal energy conversion end to end efficiency. Diesel engines can also approach 35% energy conversion efficiency, hence thier use in freight hauling. To break it down: 100% of the fuel’s energy is supplied of that: 45% is lost to waste heat in the exhaust 30% is lost to waste heat in the cooling 18% is lost to engine friction 2% is lost to air pumping through the intake and exhaust 2% is lost to the oil, water pump, alternator, power steering.... 1.3% is lost to the piston and ring friction 1.1% is lost to the primary drive friction 1.1% is lost to manual gearbox transmission losses 3% is lost in automatic transmissions 1.1% is lost in the final drive to the wheels 0.4% is lost to crankshaft friction and windage 0.3% is lost to valve friction The sum total is, of all these losses to wasted heat or friction; of the 100% of the energy in the fuel you burn you are only getting about 18% of it to the wheel where it propels you forward, then more is lost to rolling resistance and wind resistance. So for the $3.50 you are spending on that gallon of fuel $0.63 actually gets you where you are going the other $2.87 is wasted money. Would you buy stock in a company with this rate of return??? Then why do you buy a vehicle with a drivetrian that delivers such a appaling rate of return on your investement in getting yourself and your family over the surface of the earth where they need to go for the full life you wish to provide them without polluting the planet I hope...

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In a typical car, the drivetrain eats up about 5 to 6% of the energy from the engine, in an electric design it’s close to 0%.
In a typical car, the drivetrain eats up about 5 to 6% of the energy from the engine, in an electric design it’s close to 0%.

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A electric motor itself is fantastically efficient, varying between 85 and 95% efficient across the entire range of speeds!
A electric motor itself is fantastically efficient, varying between 85 and 95% efficient across the entire range of speeds! verses 14-24% for the piston engine.

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Why is an electric car soo much more efficient than my dino juice powered piston engine car or truck?
Why is an electric car soo much more efficient than my dino juice powered piston engine car or truck? The link below is an informative read: http://matter2energy.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/wells-to-wheels-electric-car-efficiency/

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How does the tank to wheel efficiency compare between an electric and petrol car?
How does the tank to wheel efficiency compare between an electric and petrol car? So, a rough estimate of the total round-trip tank to wheel efficiency of an electron drive is: 0.90 (motor and drivetrain) x 0.95 (inverter) x 0.90 (battery) x 0.95 (charger) = 73% How does this compare to a conventional car? Quite well in fact. A normal gasoline car has a tank-to-wheel efficiency of 16%. That’s right, an electric car is over four times as efficient at turning energy into motion.

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Why do we need to make a Global Shift to electric vehicle's, electron drive-train?
Why do we need to make a Global Shift to electric vehicle's, electron drive-train? For those of you not interested in the particulars, suffice it to say that the electron drivetrain, even at 27 cents per kWh (currently the most expensive in the U.S.), you will be paying about half as much per mile in "fuel" costs as your average family sedan at $3 per gallon gas. On top of that, you won't have to go to the service shop for oil changes anymore (saving about $30 every 3-4 months for most Americans). As well as most all of the drivetrain maintenance costs will be eliminated. The he average US electricity rate of 12 cents per kWh, you would be paying about a quarter as much for "fuel" costs—dropping your yearly fuel bill from about $1,400 to $350. With concious selection of the source of the electricity you purchase the electric car can significantly reduce your life's carbon footprint upon this planet! The first point to consider, is that the intrinsic energy required to build a vehicle has a impact on our economy and ecosystem. As does the energy required to power it. We currently use vehicles with piston engines burning non renewable high CO2 petroleum, their mechanism last on average about 11 years. This means the average person will most likely require 5 cars to be built for them. With the use of recycled materials the material costs can be mitigated, but the energy to smelt the metal, frame, wiring and other components will still be required. So what is it that is the Achilles heal of the piston engine and its drive-train? It's self, its wear and complexity. Engines, transmissions, and drive lines do not last much more than 300,000 miles and the average person drives 1,000,000 in a lifetime. Just think, how many people commute or work their grandparents cars and trucks? Then we must look at the energy the mechanism uses, in the case of the piston petrol engine the non renewable fuel source is becoming scarce and expensive. If you look at its total well to wheel efficiency a mere %14 of the energy of petroleum is making it to your rear wheel to propel you down the road. Some 86% of the energy is wasted but we must still endure 100% of the CO2 emissions. The current total cost of ownership for a car - truck for 5 years is averaging $30,000 - $50,000. That is a expensive both financially and environmentally; form of transportation. Now lets make the same comparison of an electric vehicle:

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Last Updated: 15 May 2016 12:04:33 PDT home  |  about  |  terms  |  contact
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